IS PrEP OUR SAVIOUR?

The sexual revolution of the 1960s and ’70s came to an abrupt and brutal end for many gay and bi men the moment AIDS was traced to sexual contact. In the early days of the epidemic, sex between men was equated with AIDS, not just in the mainstream media, but also in prevention efforts by other gay men. Since AIDS in those days was seen as a death sentence, for men who had sex with men, every sexual interaction carried the risk of death. Indeed, tens of thousands died of AIDS-related conditions.

While some men with HIV outlasted all predictions and became long-term survivors, the widespread adoption of condoms is credited with dramatically reducing HIV transmissions among gay and bi men in subsequent years. Yet reliance on nothing but that layer of silicone — a barrier some complain prevents true intimacy and pleasure — couldn’t erase the gnawing dread gay men felt that every sexual encounter could be the one where HIV caught up to them.

There have been, of course, moments when nearly every gay or bi man has allowed their passions to override their fears and enjoyed the skin-on-skin contact that opposite-sex couples often take for granted. Thinking back on those unbridled and unprotected moments of passion filled many of these men with terror, regret, and guilt.

Shame and gay sex have a very long history and it takes much self-reflection — and often therapy — to feel proud and unashamed of our sex when everything around us tells us that it’s dirty, immoral, or illegitimate.

Since the late 1990s and the advent of lifesaving antiretroviral drugs, some of the angst around sex between men faded — and with that came changes in behavior. Condom use, once reliably high among gay and bisexual men, has dropped off in the past two decades.

Now there’s hope the younger generation may also experience worry-free sex lives — without the side effects of living with HIV.

The revolution of PrEP is what they relied on to keep themselves safe, but will this pill really prevent HIV?

When you consider the fact that our sexuality is at the core of our humanity and it is as integral to us as our appetite, can we take that chance?

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3 Comments Add yours

  1. renudepride says:

    PrEP is an obvious advantage in the fight against rising sexually transmitted HIV infections (although its effectiveness in non-sexual transmissions isn’t known). With approximately a 90+% success rate in stopping the sexual transmission of the disease, it is by far a significant factor in curbing infection rates for all persons. Naked hugs!

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  2. PDQ says:

    It also reduces bone density and can damage your kidneys. And it does nothing against other diseases like Herpes, Syphillis, Gonorrhea, HPV, etc. By itself, it’s not a magic cure for what ails us.

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  3. I should know this, after my prescription and later ingestion after lunch. I felt a burning sensation through my right upper stomach and most likely my kidney. Tried it the second and third day and the same thing. I stopped using the drug and now better off with condom use. However I know at some point I would like to go raw if I connect with a special someone.

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